MHAM: Book Reviews.

Hey there, readers! We are still in may which means we are still in the Metal Health Awareness Month!

This time i wanted to share with you some of my reviews for books that touch mental health problems. There aren’t much because most of the time i find it very hard and triggering to review this kind of books, but anyway, there are a few reviews i managed over the years.

I hope you can enjoy them and maybe they’ll interest you enough to give some of the books a chance!

May is Mental Health Awareness Month | American Behavioral Clinics

We Are The Ants by Shaun David Hutchinson

Forgive Me, Leonard Peacock by Matthew Quick

Highly Illogical Behavior by John Corey Whaley

I’m Thinking of Ending Things by Iain Reid

Playlist For The Dead by Michelle Falkoff

More Than This by Patrick Ness

All The Bright Places by Jennifer Niven

The Rest Of Us Just Live Here by Patrick Ness

Homeroom Diaries by James Patterson

This Winter by Alice Oseman

Heartstopper V.1-4 By Alice Oseman

Hold Still by Nina LaCour

May is Mental Health Awareness Month | Smokey Point Behavioral Hospital

MHAM: Books About Mental Illness.

Hey there, everyone!

So i was going on with my day when i reazlied that after commenting on the fact that May is Mental Health Awareness Month i haven’t posted anything on the topic.

I know mental illnesses are a very difficult topic to talk and read about because they can trigger a lot of bad feelings, but sometimes we need to read about them, so we can grow from our pain and struggles.

This is why i thought about sharing with you some books which treat the different topics of mental illnesses. Some of them you may have read or heard about but maybe some of them are new to you and they can help you on your struggle or to help/understand a friend.

All the Bright Places

The Fault in Our Stars meets Eleanor and Park in this exhilarating and heart-wrenching love story about a girl who learns to live from a boy who intends to die.

Soon to be a major motion picture starring Elle Fanning!

Theodore Finch is fascinated by death, and he constantly thinks of ways he might kill himself. But each time, something good, no matter how small, stops him.
 
Violet Markey lives for the future, counting the days until graduation, when she can escape her Indiana town and her aching grief in the wake of her sister’s recent death.
 
When Finch and Violet meet on the ledge of the bell tower at school, it’s unclear who saves whom. And when they pair up on a project to discover the “natural wonders” of their state, both Finch and Violet make more important discoveries: It’s only with Violet that Finch can be himself—a weird, funny, live-out-loud guy who’s not such a freak after all. And it’s only with Finch that Violet can forget to count away the days and start living them. But as Violet’s world grows, Finch’s begins to shrink.
 
This is an intense, gripping novel perfect for fans of Jay Asher, Rainbow Rowell, John Green, Gayle Forman, and Jenny Downham from a talented new voice in YA, Jennifer Niven.

Made You Up

Reality, it turns out, is often not what you perceive it to be—sometimes, there really is someone out to get you. Made You Up tells the story of Alex, a high school senior unable to tell the difference between real life and delusion.

Alex fights a daily battle to figure out the difference between reality and delusion. Armed with a take-no-prisoners attitude, her camera, a Magic 8-Ball, and her only ally (her little sister), Alex wages a war against her schizophrenia, determined to stay sane long enough to get into college. She’s pretty optimistic about her chances until classes begin, and she runs into Miles. Didn’t she imagine him? Before she knows it, Alex is making friends, going to parties, falling in love, and experiencing all the usual rites of passage for teenagers. But Alex is used to being crazy. She’s not prepared for normal.

Finding Audrey

Audrey can’t leave the house. she can’t even take off her dark glasses inside the house.

Then her brother’s friend Linus stumbles into her life. With his friendly, orange-slice smile and his funny notes, he starts to entice Audrey out again – well, Starbucks is a start. And with Linus at her side, Audrey feels like she can do the things she’d thought were too scary. Suddenly, finding her way back to the real world seems achievable.

Get Well Soon (Anna Bloom, #1)

Anna Bloom is depressed—so depressed that her parents have committed her to a mental hospital with a bunch of other messed-up teens. Here she meets a roommate with a secret (and a plastic baby), a doctor who focuses way too much on her weight, and a cute, shy boy who just might like her.

But wait! Being trapped in a loony bin isn’t supposed to be about making friends, losing weight, and having a crush, is it?

In her fiction debut, Julie Halpern finds humor in the unlikeliest of places, and presents a character whose voice—and heart—will resonate with all of us who have ever felt just a little bit crazy.

Hold Still

An arresting story about starting over after a friend’s suicide, from a breakthrough new voice in YA fictiondear caitlin, there are so many things that i want so badly to tell you but i just can’t.

Devastating, hopeful, hopeless, playful . . . in words and illustrations, Ingrid left behind a painful farewell in her journal for Caitlin. Now Caitlin is left alone, by loss and by choice, struggling to find renewed hope in the wake of her best friend’s suicide. With the help of family and newfound friends, Caitlin will encounter first love, broaden her horizons, and start to realize that true friendship didn’t die with Ingrid. And the journal which once seemed only to chronicle Ingrid’s descent into depression, becomes the tool by which Caitlin once again reaches out to all those who loved Ingrid–and Caitlin herself.

When We Collided

We are seventeen and shattered and still dancing. We have messy, throbbing hearts, and we are stronger than anyone could ever know…

Jonah never thought a girl like Vivi would come along.

Vivi didn’t know Jonah would light up her world.

Neither of them expected a summer like this…a summer that would rewrite their futures.

In an unflinching story about new love, old wounds, and forces beyond our control, two teens find that when you collide with the right person at just the right time, it will change you forever. 

OCD Love Story

When Bea meets Beck, she knows instantly that he’s her kind of crazy. Sweet, strong, kinda-messed-up Beck understands her like no one else can. He makes her feel almost normal. He makes her feel like she could fall in love again.

But despite her feelings for Beck, Bea can’t stop thinking about someone else: a guy who is gorgeous and magnetic… and has no idea Bea even exists. But Bea knows a lot about him. She spends a lot of time watching him. She has a journal full of notes. Some might even say she’s obsessed.

Bea tells herself she’s got it all under control. But this isn’t a choice, it’s a compulsion. The truth is, she’s breaking down…and she might end up breaking her own heart.

We Are the Ants

From the author of The Five Stages of Andrew Brawley comes a brand-new novel about a teenage boy who must decide whether or not the world is worth saving.

Henry Denton has spent years being periodically abducted by aliens. Then the aliens give him an ultimatum: The world will end in 144 days, and all Henry has to do to stop it is push a big red button.

Only he isn’t sure he wants to.

After all, life hasn’t been great for Henry. His mom is a struggling waitress held together by a thin layer of cigarette smoke. His brother is a jobless dropout who just knocked someone up. His grandmother is slowly losing herself to Alzheimer’s. And Henry is still dealing with the grief of his boyfriend’s suicide last year.

Wiping the slate clean sounds like a pretty good choice to him.

But Henry is a scientist first, and facing the question thoroughly and logically, he begins to look for pros and cons: in the bully who is his perpetual one-night stand, in the best friend who betrayed him, in the brilliant and mysterious boy who walked into the wrong class. Weighing the pain and the joy that surrounds him, Henry is left with the ultimate choice: push the button and save the planet and everyone on it…or let the world—and his pain—be destroyed forever.

Jerkbait

Even though they’re identical, Tristan isn’t close to his twin Robbie at all—until Robbie tries to kill himself.

Forced to share a room to prevent Robbie from hurting himself, the brothers begin to feel the weight of each other’s lives on the ice, and off. Tristan starts seeing his twin not as a hockey star whose shadow Tristan can’t escape, but a struggling gay teen terrified about coming out in the professional sports world. Robbie’s future in the NHL is plagued by anxiety and the mounting pressure from their dad, coach, and scouts, while Tristan desperately fights to create his own future, not as a hockey player but a musical theatre performer.

As their season progresses and friends turn out to be enemies, Robbie finds solace in an online stranger known only as “Jimmy2416.” Between keeping Robbie’s secret and saving him from taking his life, Tristan is given the final call: sacrifice his dream for a brother he barely knows, or pursue his own path. How far is Robbie willing to go—and more importantly, how far is Tristan willing to go to help him?

Highly Illogical Behavior

Sixteen-year-old Solomon is agoraphobic. He hasn’t left the house in three years, which is fine by him.

Ambitious Lisa desperately wants to get into the second-best psychology program for college (she’s being realistic). But is ambition alone enough to get her in?

Enter Lisa.

Determined to “fix” Sol, Lisa steps into his world, along with her charming boyfriend, Clark, and soon the three form an unexpected bond. But, as Lisa learns more about Sol and he and Clark grow closer and closer, the walls they’ve built around themselves start to collapse and their friendships threaten to do the same.

More Happy Than Not

Part Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind, part Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe, Adam Silvera’s extraordinary debut confronts race, class, and sexuality during one charged near-future summer in the Bronx.

Sixteen-year-old Aaron Soto is struggling to find happiness after a family tragedy leaves him reeling. He’s slowly remembering what happiness might feel like this summer with the support of his girlfriend Genevieve, but it’s his new best friend, Thomas, who really gets Aaron to open up about his past and confront his future.

As Thomas and Aaron get closer, Aaron discovers things about himself that threaten to shatter his newfound contentment. A revolutionary memory-alteration procedure, courtesy of the Leteo Institute, might be the way to straighten himself out. But what if it means forgetting who he truly is?

Playlist for the Dead

A moving, poignant, compelling YA debut, as a 15-year-old boy struggles to understand his best friend’s suicide through the list of songs he leaves behind.

Here’s what Sam knows: There was a party. There was a fight. The next morning, his best friend, Hayden, was dead. And all he left Sam was a playlist of songs, and a suicide note: For Sam – listen and you’ll understand.

As he listens to song after song, Sam tries to face up to what happened the night Hayden killed himself. But it’s only by taking out his earbuds and opening his eyes to the people around him that he will finally be able to piece together his best friend’s story. And maybe have a chance to change his own.

Part mystery, part love story, and part coming-of-age tale in the vein of Stephen Chbosky’s The Perks of Being a Wallflower, Playlist for the Dead is an honest and gut-wrenching first novel about loss, rage, what it feels like to outgrow a friendship that’s always defined you – and the struggle to redefine yourself.

The Shock of the Fall

WINNER OF THE COSTA BOOK OF THE YEAR 2013

‘I’ll tell you what happened because it will be a good way to introduce my brother. His name’s Simon. I think you’re going to like him. I really do. But in a couple of pages he’ll be dead. And he was never the same after that.’

Debut novel about one man’s descent into mental illness, following the death of his brother in childhood. Filer is a mental health nurse with a unique and startling insight into mental illness, and this book highlights a much-neglected subject.

Challenger Deep

Caden Bosch is on a ship that’s headed for the deepest point on Earth: Challenger Deep, the southern part of the Marianas Trench.

Caden Bosch is a brilliant high school student whose friends are starting to notice his odd behaviour.

Caden Bosch is designated the ship’s artist in residence to document the journey with images.

Caden Bosch pretends to join the school track team but spends his days walking for miles, absorbed by the thoughts in his head.

Caden Bosch is split between his allegiance to the captain and the allure of mutiny.

Caden Bosch is torn.

Turtles All the Way Down

It all begins with a fugitive billionaire and the promise of a cash reward. Turtles All the Way Down is about lifelong friendship, the intimacy of an unexpected reunion, Star Wars fan fiction, and tuatara. But at its heart is Aza Holmes, a young woman navigating daily existence within the ever-tightening spiral of her own thoughts.

In his long-awaited return, John Green shares Aza’s story with shattering, unflinching clarity.

These are only some books which touch the mental health topic, you can just do a little search and find a lot more. Mental health is an important issue, and we deserve and need to give the people who need help. Maybe not ourselves, because we may not understand much about the topic but we own the people who need the help (myself included) to help them seek for the people who can help them get through.

Please, if you see someone in distress or if you yourself are feeling it, seek and ask for the right people for help ♥

MHAM: Books I Want To Read

Before the month ends, …  thought i could share some of the books about mental illness that are sitting on my TBR, because, why not? you may find them interesting yourself and you may check them too!

It's Kind of a Funny Story It’s Kind Of A Funny Story by Ned Vizzini.

Synopsis: Ambitious New York City teenager Craig Gilner is determined to succeed at life – which means getting into the right high school to get into the right job. But once Craig aces his way into Manhattan’s Executive Pre-Professional High School, the pressure becomes unbearable. He stops eating and sleeping until, one night, he nearly kills himself.

Craig’s suicidal episode gets him checked into a mental hospital, where his new neighbors include a transsexual sex addict, a girl who has scarred her own face with scissors, and the self-elected President Armelio. There, Craig is finally able to confront the sources of his anxiety.

The author himself spent time in a psychiatric hospital … sadly even though he wrote an unexpected journey to happiness, he ended his life in 2013.

The Bell Jar The Bell Jar by Sylvia Plath.

Synopsis: Sylvia Plath’s shocking, realistic, and intensely emotional novel about a woman falling into the grip of insanity.

Esther Greenwood is brilliant, beautiful, enormously talented, and successful, but slowly going under—maybe for the last time. In her acclaimed and enduring masterwork, Sylvia Plath brilliantly draws the reader into Esther’s breakdown with such intensity that her insanity becomes palpably real, even rational—as accessible an experience as going to the movies. A deep penetration into the darkest and most harrowing corners of the human psyche, The Bell Jar is an extraordinary accomplishment and a haunting American classic.

I feel this book is a must in my life, yet, i haven’t found the right time and mood to read it since i feel i really need to be in the exact (and right) state of mind to read it … Sylvia Plath is another amazing author who ended her own life.

Brain on Fire: My Month of Madness Brain on Fire: My Month of Madness by Susannah Cahalan.

Synopsis: When twenty-four-year-old Susannah Cahalan woke up alone in a hospital room, strapped to her bed and unable to move or speak, she had no memory of how she’d gotten there. Days earlier, she had been on the threshold of a new, adult life: at the beginning of her first serious relationship and a promising career at a major New York newspaper. Now she was labeled violent, psychotic, a flight risk. What happened?

In a swift and breathtaking narrative, Cahalan tells the astonishing true story of her descent into madness, her family’s inspiring faith in her, and the lifesaving diagnosis that nearly didn’t happen.

An interesting story to say the least. I’ve been planning on reading this book for months now, i just need to find the right moment…

Suicide Notes Suicide Notes by Michael Thomas Ford.

Synopsis: I’m not crazy. I don’t see what the big deal is about what happened. But apparently, someone does think it’s a big deal because here I am. I bet it was my mother. She always overreacts.

Fifteen-year-old Jeff wakes up on New Year’s Day to find himself in the hospital. Make that the psychiatric ward. With the nutjobs. Clearly, this is all a huge mistake. Forget about the bandages on his wrists and the notes on his chart. Forget about his problems with his best friend, Allie, and her boyfriend, Burke. Jeff’s perfectly fine, perfectly normal, not like the other kids in the hospital with him. Now they’ve got problems. But a funny thing happens as his forty-five-day sentence drags on: the crazies start to seem less crazy.

This book has been sitting on my kindle waiting for me to pick it up for ages now, and i really don’t know why haven’t i … i hope i get to it soon enough… i haven’t read nearly as many books about mental health as i expect this far.

Cut Cut by Patricia McCormick.

Synopsis: Callie cuts herself. Never too deep, never enough to die. But enough to feel the pain. Enough to feel the scream inside.

Now she’s at Sea Pines, a “residential treatment facility” filled with girls struggling with problems of their own. Callie doesn’t want to have anything to do with them. She doesn’t want to have anything to do with anyone. She won’t even speak.

But Callie can only stay silent for so long…

Since i’ve been hospitalized twice and i lived with mentally ill people (as myself) for years, i’ve meet many people who cut themselves as a way of releasing pain.. now, i find this book a very interesting way of entering the mind of this kind of people or at least that’s what i hope i’ll be finding when i read this book. Interesting and promising.

The Shock of the Fall The Shock of the Fall by Nathan Filer.

Synopsis: ‘I’ll tell you what happened because it will be a good way to introduce my brother. His name’s Simon. I think you’re going to like him. I really do. But in a couple of pages he’ll be dead. And he was never the same after that.’

There are books you can’t stop reading, which keep you up all night.

There are books which let us into the hidden parts of life and make them vividly real.

There are books which, because of the sheer skill with which every word is chosen, linger in your mind for days.

The Shock of the Fall is all of these books.

The Shock of the Fall is an extraordinary portrait of one man’s descent into mental illness. It is a brave and groundbreaking novel from one of the most exciting new voices in fiction.

I think this book isn’t just about mental illness but also about grief? … i’m not quite sure, but i’ve been wanting to read this book for at least a year now.. i’m just a little worried about how much it may hurt to actually read it.. it looks like such a promising book… i’m sure i’ll manage to read it soon enough.

Well, these are the six books about mental illness/health i’ve been looking forward to read the most… obviously there are other books about the topic have on my TBR, but these are the ones calling me the most…

Do you have any books about mental health you are looking forward to read? if so.. what are they?

’til next time 😉

firma

Optimists Die First by Susin Nielsen | Overview

Optimists Die FirstOptimists Die First by Susin Nielsen

Genre: YA Contemporary, Mental Health
Pages: 240
Publisher: Wendy Lamb Books
Rating: 3 stars

Summary: Life ahead: Proceed with caution.

Sixteen-year-old Petula De Wilde is anything but wild. A family tragedy has made her shut herself off from the world. Once a crafting fiend with a happy life, Petula now sees danger in everything, from airplanes to ground beef.

The worst part of her week is her comically lame mandatory art therapy class. She has nothing in common with this small band of teenage misfits, except that they all carry their own burden of guilt.

When Jacob joins their ranks, he seems so normal and confident. Petula wants nothing to do with him, or his prosthetic arm. But when they’re forced to collaborate on a unique school project, she slowly opens up, and he inspires her to face her fears.

Until a hidden truth threatens to derail everything.

My Opinion On The Book:

I had a particular problem with this book, even after i finished reading it, i couldn’t tell what the plotline was… Sure, it’s about a grl in a therapy class and a new kid in class with whom she sorts of becomes friends, but i think that’s all i can say about the book as the plot.

I’m not sure if it was because of the way it was written or the story itself, but i found it difficult to follow and get invested on it.

I got to admit i didn’t connect to the characters either, they were sort of interesting and such but not to the point to make me really care about them.

One of the things i did enjoy on the book was the way it portraited grief. Like, many of the people on the book lost someone and every one of them dealt differently, which for me felt very real and important to show… we are not all the same and though there are 5 stages of grief we react differently and move on, or not in different ways.

Overall, i do not regret reading it, and i would recommend it to some specific people but i don’t know… i was expecting something more from it.

‘Til Next Time 😉

firma

Get Well Soon by Julie Halpern | Review

Get Well Soon (Anna Bloom, #1)Get Well Soon (Anna Bloom #1) by Julie Halpern

Genre: YA, Realistic Fiction, Mental Health
Pages: 208
Publisher: Feiwes & Friends
Rating: 3.5 stars

Summary:  Anna Bloom is depressed, so depressed that her parents have committed her to a mental hospital with a bunch of other messed-up teens. Here she meets a roommate with a secret (and a plastic baby), a doctor who focuses way too much on her weight, and a cute, shy boy who just might like her.

But wait! Being trapped in a loony bin isn’t supposed to be about making friends, losing weight, and having a crush, is it?

My opinion on the book:

When i picked up this book i don’t know what i was looking for, but i gotta admit that i found so much more than what i was expecting.

Anna has been committed to a mental hospital because of her depression and now she is living in this different kind of world (figuratively). All she wants is to go back to her normal life and while waiting for it, she writes letters to her best friend.

From the letters she writes, this is an epistolary book, we learn about her life in the hospital, the people she meets there and how is she feeling.

Never before i picked up this book i’d read about a mental hospital and it was such an eyes opener. The things that happened in the ward brought me back to the time i myself was hospitalized because it was so much like it. So many times while reading i wanted to stop Anna and explain to her why the things were like they are… Looking at it from a different point of view and time made me realize a lot of things i didn’t when i was in the hospital myself and it felt sort of cathartic.

I ‘ve to admit i didn’t like much the characters and to be completely honest though i remember some of the plotlines i don’t remember even the names of the different characters.

Personally, i didn’t like the main character, Anna, at all… she was annoying and too self-involved. Maybe i saw traits of myself i don’t like in her and that’s why.

But the thing that after all this time stays with me is how much it reminds me of my times on the psychiatric ward.

The book is written pretty straight forward, it’s just a teenage girl writing everything that happens to her to her best friend, and that’s how it feels, nothing out of the ordinary.

Overall, it was a weird book to read… and by this, i’m talking about the uncanny resemblance to my time on the hospital.. i wonder how many people who read this felt the same as me or if their experience was so different this feels fake to them. If you really want to know my story parallels more than 50%-50% to what happens on the book.

‘Til Next Time 😉

firma

 

 

MHAM: Books Reviewed

Hello everyone! So, I’ve been busier than expected this month, but i  hope to work onfinchandviolet some posts this weekend. Anyway

Anyway, i didn’t want to leave you without some more Mental Health Awareness Month related posts so i decided on sharing with you the book reviews i wrote about books that feature mental illness, these go from slight touches on the topic to being heavily featured on the book.

We Are The Ants by Shaun David Hutchinson

Forgive Me, Leonard Peacock by Matthew Quick

Highly Illogical Behavior by John Corey Whaley

I’m Thinking of Ending Things by Iain Reid

Playlist For The Dead by Michelle Falkoff

More Than This by Patrick Ness

All The Bright Places by Jennifer Niven

The Rest Of Us Just Live Here by Patrick Ness

Homeroom Diaries by James Patterson

 

May is Mental Health Awareness Month

I know it’s been a really long time since i wrote something for the blog, and to be completely honest it’s all Skam’s fault.  In case you don’t know what Skam is… well, it’s THE TV SHOW… i’ll be posting about it sometime soon… or at least i hope.

Anyway, this month is Mental Health Awareness Month.

As a person battling mental illness since i was 16 (though i’m pretty sure it started before, but i was diagnosed at 16) i believe it’s part of my ‘job’ to talk about this topic. Obviously relating this to books, since my blog is about books and literature, but not only that.

I was hoping you could give me your opinion on what would you want to read about relating to mental health, i have a lot to say about it, but i don’t wanna just throw all of that to you.

Obviously, this month i have a tbr just consisting of books that feature mentally ill characters, which i hope will make the cut and become reviews.  I’ll be posting the

I’ll be posting the tbr later in the week. I want to talk about mentally ill characters and their representation on books and tv shows. I’ll be giving some book recommendations and i may talk about books that didn’t work out for me. Maybe,  if you want me to also recommend some movies or just talk about own experiences, or if you want to share your on experience with mental illness… i’m open to all ideas right now.

I truly see this month as an opportunity to make a change in how people see and think about mental illness. I think it’s our job to make the difference, to speak up about the issue and not be afraid to say ‘yeah, i suffer from…’ (in my case depression and avoidant personality disorder).

So yes, i’m open to ideas and any recommendations really at the moment.

I hope we can make the best of this month.

‘Til next time!

firma

 

 

Some previous posts i made on the topic of mental illness:

Mental Illness & Literature.

#Life With A Mental Illness